History Department

Graduate Student Research

History of Soccer in Zambian Towns (Hikabwa Chipande, PhD Candidate History)

The History of Soccer in Zambian Towns project explores the political and social history of football in Zambia from the 1940s to the present. Drawing on archival and oral sources, the project focuses specifically on ten towns, each of which are connected by the main rail line Zambia. The towns, including Chililabombwe, Chingola, Mufulira, Luanshya, Kitwe, Ndola, Kabwe, Lusaka, Mazabuka and Livingstone, all have a long history of football … READ MORE 


➠ Interview with Hikabwa Chipande on Sports in Africa: Sports and Community Building in Africa and the Global South, Ohio University – April 6-7, 2012

 

Constructing the Ciudad Deportiva (Alex Galarza, PhD Candidate History)

The Ciudad Deportiva was a mix between a stadium complex and amusement park built by the Argentine soccer club Boca Júniors Fútbol Club. The project was built over seven artificial islands on sixty hectares of land filled in Buenos Aires’s Rio de la Plata. Besides an enormous 140,000-seat stadium and various athletic facilities, the project was to include an aquarium, mini-golf, mechanical rides for children, and a drive-in movie theater for 500 cars. This project combined public and private funds, embodying a new vision of middle-class consumption that fit into city planner’s designs for a modern city with ample leisure space. Yet, a combination of poor engineering, financial mismanagement, and political disputes ensured that the ambitious plans started in 1965 would be largely abandoned by the 1978 World Cup deadline. This episode is an illuminating historical case study that reveals the wider relationship between civic associations and mass consumer culture during a time of political and economic upheaval in Argentina. By studying the relationship between the state, urban citizens, and members of Boca Júniors, this project advances our understanding of the relationship between soccer and society in mid-twentieth century Argentina.

The digital repository and exhibit for this project, Constructing the Ciudad Deportiva, is developed be Alex Galarza, an History PhD candidate, and will also serve as a prototype repository and exhibit for his larger digital dissertation … READ MORE

 

Settler Colonialism Uncovered (Ashley Sanders, History PhD Candidate)

The majority of present-day states are former colonies or colonial metropoles, a number of which were or still are settler colonies. Consequently, it is essential to know where and how such colonies formed to understand current geopolitics and to raise

awareness of their legacy, especially inpresent-day settler colonies, such as the United States, Canada, New Zealand, and Australia. The Settler Colonialism Uncovered project is the first step toward making information about two prototypes of settler colonization – the United States and French Algeria – available for high school and undergraduate students and educators, as well as early-stage researchers and the general public through a website … READ MORE

 

“Sixteen Tons”: A U.S. and South African Mineworkers’ Archive (Micallee Sullivan, PhD Candidate History)

The Sixteen Tons digital archive tells the story of these workers, their families, and their communities by creating a public archive and online exhibit that documents the history of two mining towns. In Clifton-Morenci, Arizona, the copper company, Phelps Dodge created an economic and political stronghold over the community and workers that paralleled the strength of the De Beers company in South Africa. Yet, mineworkers, their families, and the communities in each of these areas modified, shaped, contested, and sometimes resisted this economic and political control. This digital archive will focus on the rank and file workers of these two mining districts both in and out of the workplace and draw attention to how workers created their own identities, communities, and forms of resistance to counter the economic and political control of two powerful mining companies … READ MORE