Katie Carline


At Michigan State, I study the social and religious history of South Africa, particularly in the Eastern Cape region. I am interested in religious identities, consumer culture, and migration in the early twentieth century. I study how religious networks and identities shaped African consumer culture across urban and rural Eastern Cape, and how particular ethics of consumption allowed people to situate themselves in segregation-era South Africa.

In 2016 and 2017, I have been on the organizing committee of the Migration With(out) Boundaries Graduate Student conference.

Additionally, I am interested in the digital humanities broadly, and specifically in making academic research about South African history accessible and interesting to public audiences. I am currently a 2017-2018 fellow in the Cultural Heritage and Informatics (CHI) Initiative, organized by the MSU Department of Anthropology and MATRIX.

Before moving to East Lansing, I lived in Kenya and Canada. In 2012, I completed a B.A.(hons) in History at Tyndale University College in Toronto, Ontario. In 2015, I completed an M.A. in African History at Dalhousie University, Halifax. My thesis, titled, “Undefeated Ambition in an Unsympathetic Empire: the Kat River Settlement in the Cape Colony, 1853-1872” won the 2016 Governor General’s Gold Medal for Humanities and Social Sciences. 

Year in Program: 2

Fields: African History (South Africa), World History, Digital History

Advisor: Peter Alegi

Committee: Peter Alegi, Laura Fair, Glenn Chambers, Dean Rehberger

Research Languages: isiZulu

Educational Background: M.A. African History, Dalhousie University (2015); B.A.(hons) History, Tyndale University College (2012)

CV:

Email: carlinek@msu.edu